How To Get Even With Your Car Insurance Company In 10 Easy Steps – Part 2

In Part 1, we detailed the first five strategies on how to cut your car insurance costs. In Part 2, we show you the second five.

STEP 6 – Review, Change or Cancel No Fault & PIP (Personal Injury Protection)

No-Fault Coverage, and it’s Twin – PIP – started out as great idea’s. Your premiums were actually going to be lowered. Then, your State Politicians got involved (at the urging of Insurance Lobbyists, of course) and mucked it up.

You see, no-fault insurance coverage was originally intended to have each individual’s losses, covered by their own car insurance company – no matter who was at fault.

Today, in many States, car insurance companies are making a ton of money on no-fault because the insurance companies convinced State law-makers to make “modifications.”

Today, because of the these changes, car insurance companies have actually used the no-fault laws to reduce payments on a claim made by a customer, instead of reducing car insurance premiums as it was supposed to do.

So, premiums keep going up-and-up and insurance companies end up paying less for claims – Someone’s getting rich on that deal….and it’s not you.

And to make matters worse, some States (with really, really talented Insurance Lobbyist’s) also require an additional premium be paid on top of the no-fault premium. This beauty is called Personal Injury Protection (PIP).

PIP is a “wide-blanket” of coverage and can provide Collision Coverage, Hospitalization, Social Security Disability, Workers Comp, Personal Disability Insurance & Life Insurance.

The problem with PIP and what it covers is….

You already gave most, if not all, of these coverage’s anyway, don’t you? So, you’re paying twice!

So, you need to do a couple of things:

Google “minimum levels of required auto insurance” to see if No-Fault Insurance and/or PIP Is required in your State;

Then, check your policy. If it’s not required by your State to have No-Fault/PIP Coverage and it’s on your policy – cancel it. If No-Fault/PIP is required by your State….take the absolute minimum. Here’s how.

If you must have No-Fault/PIP, ask for and get a deductible from your car insurance company.

STEP 7 – Cancel Medical Coverage.

Medical Coverage, on most car insurance policies, is a promise to pay “reasonable” medical expenses for anyone who is riding in your car should you have an accident…as well as anyone in your car should it get hit by someone else.

Cancel it. You don’t need it.

Why is that you say? Well, medical coverage as part of your car insurance policy is a duplicate of your own:

– Medical Plan; – Any Life Insurance Coverage you might have, as well as; – The Liability Sections of almost every car insurance policy written in the U.S.

Think of it this way….Do you have a Health/Medical/Hospitalization Plan through work or an Association you belong to?

Then why are you paying premiums for Medical/Hospitalization Coverage on your Car Insurance Policy?

Here’s what’s going to happen when you tell the car insurance company or Agent that you “Don’t want the Hospitalization/Medical Coverage.” You’re going to hear very slick “scare tactics” to help change your mind.

The insurance company employee will say “Well, if you’re in an accident, and it’s your fault, who’s going to cover the medical bills for any injured passengers in your car?”

Here’s your answer. Your family is already covered by your Health/Hospitalization Plan. If anybody else is in the car and they’re injured – they’re covered by your Bodily Injury Liability coverage that you’re already paying for….and their own Health/Hospitalization Plan.

So go ahead – save some more money and get rid of this coverage.

STEP 8 – Cancel Death, Dismemberment & Loss of Sight.

Do you have any of these coverage’s on your existing car insurance policy? If so – cancel them.

And if you’re a first time car insurance buyer or, just looking at getting several car insurance quotes, don’t let anyone talk you into them!

Why?

Because, these coverage’s are an absolute waste of money. Most of these optional coverage’s are simply “glorified” life insurance policies with ridiculous provisions and horribly overpriced premiums. If you need life insurance, make it a separate Insurance Policy.

STEP 9 – Cancel The Extras

Do you have “Roadside Assistance” or “Rental Car Reimbursement” on your policy? If so, cancel them.

And again, if you’re a first time insurance buyer or getting a few car insurance quotes, don’t bother with these coverage’s.

Why? Because they’re severely overpriced, are rarely ever used, and limit what you can and cannot do.

For instance, some rental car reimbursement” coverage is almost $100 a year for each vehicle on your policy. So if you have two cars, you’ll spend almost $2,000 on rental car coverage in the next 10 years – and likely never even use it.

And roadside assistance? The piece-of-mind it offers gets trampled by the premiums the car insurance companies want for this coverage. Roadside assistance is a good idea. But use AAA for a cheaper solution.

STEP 10 – Terminate Comprehensive & Collision Coverage On Older Cars.

If you have an older car – by that I mean one that’s worth less than $2,000 wholesale (the amount a car dealer would give you if you were trading it in) cancel any Comprehensive and Collision Coverage you have or decline that option when getting a car insurance quote.

Here’s why. If an 8 year-old car and a brand new car have identical damage, the cost to repair both will be identical as well, even though the 8 year-old car is worth next-to-nothing.

You see the cost of a bumper and fender are the same – whether it’s for a brand new car, or one that is 8 years-old. That’s why your premiums don’t go down as the value of the car goes down. Your payments remain almost the same, year-after-year-after-year.

But, the bottom drops-out of what you’ll be able to collect on that older car. For instance, if your car is “totaled”, your insurance company will only pay you the wholesale value of your car.

So, let’s say your car is worth $1,000, but the total damage is more than $4,000, the insurance company is only going to give you a check for $1,000….minus your deductible, of course.

So you might end up getting $500 back. Sounds like a lousy deal….but that’s how it works.

So, the rule-of-thumb is this – cancel your comp & collision coverage when your vehicles value is less than $2,000….or you’ll be throwing your money away.

Okay – you’ve jotted down some notes and are ready to make some changes to your car insurance policy. So pick up the phone and start slashing your premiums!

Top 10 Misunderstood Things About Car Insurance

After spending many years in the insurance industry we have come up with a top 10 list of most misunderstood things about car insurance.  These car insurance myths are some of the most common questions that most people have about direct car insurance either buying or reviewing their  auto insurance coverage.  Its better to find out now before you have a claim and  it’s too late.

  • I just got my 1st speeding ticket my insurance rates are going to go way up.

Reality:  If this is your first ticket your rates probably won’t even change.  Most direct car insurance providers will give you a pass if you don’t have any other tickets or claims in the past 3 to 5 years depending on the company.

  • That new Plasma TV I bought last year won’t affect my Car Insurance

Reality:  If you didn’t pay the credit card  you charged it on then it just might.  Almost all insurance companies now use some form of credit scoring when determining not only if you will qualify for insurance, but also what you will pay.  There can easily be 50% difference in rates for a person with excellent credit to someone with poor credit.

  • I just slammed my car door into my lawnmower parked in my garage, my homeowners policy will cover it

Reality:  Your homeowner’s coverage has nothing to do with covering your car.  The only way your car will be covered is if you have Comprehensive (Comp) coverage for your car.  And then only after you pay you deductible.

  • I just cracked up my friends car and I tell him don’t worry my insurance will cover it

Reality: It will but only after your friends policy pays first.  So let’s say your friend has a $500 collision deductible and you have a $250 deductible.  You would have to give your friend the $500 for his deductible as his insurance company is Primary.  Meaning your insurance will only pay after his policy limits are exhausted.  So just remember in this scenario your deductible does not matter its going to be based on your friends.

  •  If you’re riding your bicycle and get hit by a car your car insurance won’t get involved

Reality:  If you get hurt or killed while riding your bike or even walking down the street you maybe surprised to learn that you may be covered by your direct car insurance policy.  If the person driving the car didn’t have any insurance or not enough insurance to cover your injuries, your Uninsured or Underinsured coverage would pay for your claim. 

  •  Someone just broke into my car and stole all of my personal belongings out of it i.e. Cd’s, Cell phone, Christmas Presents, my car insurance will pay for it.

Reality:  Your car insurance does not cover your personal belongings left inside the car.  You are going to have to file a claim with your Homeowners or Renters insurance policy to be compensated for these items.  The general rule of thumb is your car insurance will only pay for items that are attached to the vehicle

  •  I am going to be charged more for my  Car Insurance because my car is red, blue, black, pink…

Reality:  The color of your car has absolutely nothing to do with your rates.  If you like red buy a red car, if you like black buy a black car.  Don’t ever let this silly nonsense stop you from buying a car.   

  •  I didn’t have a car for the last 2 years, this won’t affect my rates.

Reality:  Not having continuous car insurance is frowned upon by most direct car insurance companies now a day’s.  Some companies won’t penalize you for not having prior insurance.  If you don’t have prior insurance make sure you have a good excuse like you took the bus, or you were in the military, or some other legitimate reason.  Oh and by the way I couldn’t afford my insurance is not on that list

  • Telling a little white lie on my insurance application won’t affect my coverage if I ever have a claim

Reality:  This is one of the worst things a person can do.  If you lie on your insurance application there is a good chance you won’t have any coverage when you need it the most.  You think they won’t find out?  Remember these 2 things when insurance company is on the hook for a ton of money.  #1 They are going to start asking questions and the first thing they look at is your application.  Wouldn’t you if you were them?  And reason #2, the insurance companies have more money than god and they have people working full time to find this stuff out. 

  •  Buying a cheaper more reasonable car will be less to insure the a more expensive car. 

Reality: There are a lot of different factors insurance companies use to determine rates, however there are many times were the rate for the more expensive car is less than the cheaper car.  One of the biggest factors for the Comp & Collision coverage’s are how much do replacement parts cost.  Sometimes on those cheaper cars or the more exotic cars the replacement parts can cost a lot to replace.

So just remember the next time your online looking for a cheaper insurance policy, to consider some of your options.  There are hundred’s of direct auto insurance companies out there looking to get in your pocket, just make sure when the time comes you can get into theirs.

Bryan Waldo

Three Things You Didn’t Know About Car Insurance in Ontario

Useful tips for getting affordable car insurance coverage in Ontario

Car insurance in Canada is a big household expense. In fact, car insurance in Canada is more expensive than in many other countries. Ontario’s auto insurance rates are the highest in Canada – drivers pay, on average, more than $170 per month in premiums.

Complicating the issue is the fact that Ontario car insurance rules are not very straightforward. Ontario uses a hybrid combination of tort insurance (one party can sue the other) and no-fault insurance.

With high rates and seemingly arbitrary rules, what little-known facts about car insurance in Ontario might be useful for you? Read on to find out!

Do not take too much insurance (in some cases)

Robust coverage is good, but it comes at a cost. Think about your risks and insure accordingly. By law, your insurance policy has $200,000 in 3rd party liability, but it is recommended that you carry more than that. Aim for $1,000,000 at least; $2,000,000 is better. If somebody decides to sue you, costs can add up very quickly.

At the same time, however, it is not always necessary to get comprehensive coverage. For example, if you have an older car, you might decide not to get this coverage. Skipping comprehensive coverage on an older car could reduce your monthly insurance premiums.

On a new or leased vehicle, comprehensive coverage is usually a requirement.

Old car coverage can go UP! Classic car insurance rates in Ontario

The older your car, the less value it has, right? In most cases, but not always. There are two scenarios when older cars will have higher rates than new vehicles.

First, some older models of vehicles will be more expensive to insure because some models have a terrible insurance history. For example, they are prone to theft, so insuring them is risky.

Second, at some age (typically 20+ years) cars can be considered classic or antique vehicles, resulting in a special type of insurance coverage, such as classic car insurance or antique auto insurance. Only a few companies offer these types of car insurance in Ontario and, depending on your car and your driving habits (year-long vs. summer months only) car protection rates can be more expensive than mainstream vehicles.

Car insurance and rental cars

Many people are confused about rental vehicle insurance. You may think the insurance attached to your credit card is enough, but it’s not. It doesn’t cover 3rd party liability or damages to other people’s property. You also have to watch out for the rental agency’s collision damage waiver, which may not cover all the costs associated with an accident.

The best approach is to make sure that you have your own car insurance (if you have your own car), and to ensure that it also extends to rental cars – many insurers do that. If you don’t have this extension on your insurance, you can, for approximately $20 per year, buy a rider for your policy that covers rental cars. It is worth the cost since you’ll pay between $15-$20 per day for the same coverage from the rental agency.